Community data collection

Local data is crucial for understanding what an area is really like, allowing for identification of some of the challenges, but also opportunities, facing local communities.

Local statistics

Statistics can help you to:

  • Paint a clearer picture of your area
  • Highlight the scale of an issue
  • Identify which issues are most important to focus on
  • Track changes in your area over time.

Main examples of local statistics include:

Levels of statistical data

Levels of data tend to be on four scales:

  • Local authority (least detailed)
  • Wards
  • Middle layer super output areas
  • Lower layer super output areas (most detailed)

Sources of statistics by subject

Crime

  • Police: local crime statistics

Health

Heritage

Landscape

  • ‘Designated’ sites: Nature sites and areas of countryside can be ‘designated’, which means they have special status as protected areas because of their natural and cultural importance
  • Multi Agency Geographic Information for the Countryside (MAGIC): The MAGIC website provides authoritative geographic information about the natural environment from across government
  • Local authority: Green belt, existing settlement boundaries, landscape character assessment

Retail

Biodiversity

Employment

Housing

  • Household projects (local authority level)
  • Census data – housing mix, type and tenure
  • Local planning authority: Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment, Strategic Housing Market Needs Assessment, Affordable housing waiting list from housing team
  • Housing needs survey
  • Local Plan call for sites
  • Working with landowners and developers.

Other

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